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International Film Heritage Festival

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October 30, 2017 11
INTRODUCTION Guests Welcome to the 5th edition of MEMORY! International Film Heritage Festival! This year we are pleased to bring you an exceptional program on the topic of “Banned” cinema and will be joined by several very special guests, Patrons of the Festival Catherine Deneuve and Grace Swe Zin Htaik, together with Tsai Ming-liang, Lee Kang-sheng, Midi Z, Tan Pin Pin, and Eddie Cahyono. These remarkable filmmakers and actors will be introducing public screenings and will be engaging the audience in discussions throughout the festival. Luis Buñuel’s Tristana (1970) is Catherine Deneuve’s contribution this year’s program. With this film, in which she plays the title character, Buñuel—an outspoken atheist and socialist—began to understand the difficulties in getting his films past the fascist Spanish censorship. Disillusioned by the experience, Buñuel eventually became one of those transnational auteurs who produced some of their most influential works abroad. Taiwan-based director Tsai Ming-liang, probably the most internationally celebrated Malaysian filmmaker, is another such example. Few in his home country have seen his films, and Malaysian film authorities have not made it easy. I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone (2006) was banned and then closely censored and recut before being permitted a limited run at select arthouse theatres. Goodbye, Dragon Inn (2004) and Stray Dogs (2013) are features in which Tsai Ming-liang presents apocalyptic panoramas of society and explores the appeal of desolate eroticism. His more experimental arthouse work can be seen in the Walker Series (Journey to the West, 2014 and No No Sleep, 2015), where he dissects loneliness and social decay with disciplined detachment, together with his stoic, often mysterious leading man Lee Kang-sheng, whose minimalist acting corresponds perfectly to the director’s storylines. The relationship between actor and director is exposed in great detail in the self-portrait Afternoon (2015), while a different perspective on Tsai Ming-liang is offered by Saw Tiong Guan in Past Present (2013), a biographical documentary about the director which includes interviews with some of his closest colleagues and associates. Saw Tiong Guan is also a presenter at the conference on Censorship and Film accompanying the festival. Myanmar-born director Midi Z is also based in Taiwan. His films were not allowed to screen publicly in Myanmar until last year, when MEMORY! programmed his latest opus, Road To Mandalay (2016), to a packed theatre. This year we are pleased to bring you Ice Poison (2014), a critically acclaimed film about drug trafficking across the Myanmar-China border. Midi Z will replace Michel Hazanavicius as this year’s president of the Myanmar Script Fund, a satellite event launched in 2016, which provides workshops and funding to young Myanmar filmmakers. Hailing from Singapore, documentary filmmaker Tan Pin Pin is no stranger to having her work meddled with. To Singapore, with Love (2013), winner of several top documentary prizes, was banned in Singapore, creating a heated debate about free speech. Audiences will also have a chance to see her outstanding documentaries Invisible City (2007) and In Time to Come (2017), as well as to attend her presentation at the conference. Eddie Cahyono’s Siti (2014) is a raw and uncompromising depiction of poverty, which is perhaps the reason it has been kept from even a limited run in arthouse theatres by the conservative Indonesian censorship. Included in this section of the program are Leaf on a Pillow (1998) and Whispering Sands (2001), two films that the Indonesian director has found particularly inspiring. Myanmar Film Treasures Premiering this year is the newly-restored version of My Darling (Pyo Chit Lin, 1950), directed by Tin Myint, a project undertaken by MEMORY! Cinema Association in collaboration with the Asian Film Archive. This is another of the precious few classics of the Burmese screen that are still in existence. Myanmar Director U Kyi Soe Tun had been very fortunate to receive the sole surviving copy of the film elements from Tin Myint’s family, thanks which a full restoration project was possible. Starring major actors of the 1950s, Pho Par Gyi, Pho Par Lay, Kyu Kyu, this comedy reflects the vibrant local movie industry at the time. The film was shot in colour, but silent. The soundtrack will be provided by live musicians, as was customary when the film was originally released. In addition, after the immensely successful presentation last year of another restored Myanmar classic, The Emerald Jungle (Mya Ga Naing, dir. Tin Maung, 1934) is back by popular demand. We also invite you to a special screening of Bo Cartoon by U Thaddu, which will be presented by the director’s grandson, Okkar Maung (who was also a finalist in last year’s Myanmar Script Fund). Bo Cartoon has yet to be restored. Main Program: Banned Films There are various kinds of censorship, and many reasons why films never reach the public. State censorship seeks to defend national interests; censorship of the market grants or denies access based on commercial promise; technological censorship is determined by scientific development and access to new technologies; and then there are more populist forms of censorship and moral policing purporting to protect cultures, customs, and identities from social or ideological contamination. Censorship continues to be the currency of contemporary culture, and regulation is often the first response to new conditions. This year’s focus on Banned Films sketches out censorship trends across time, which have regulated both the creation of content as well as access to that content by viewers since the invention of cinema. The program follows two principal trajectories: Political and Social. The Political trajectory includes films that touch on the World Wars, the Communist regime, colonialism, and the Cold War, while the Social trajectory concerns issues of representation, moral outrage, religious and cultural conflicts.
  • The World Wars: At a time when the world was gearing up for conflict, All quiet on the western front (1930) was banned almost everywhere for “spouting anti-war, pacifist propaganda.” Contrariwise, The Men Who Tread on the Tiger’s Tail (1945) was banned by the Allies due to its portrayal of Japanese warrior resolve. Hitler was briefly a fan of Charles Chaplin, but flew into an outrage at The Great Dictator (1940) and had the film banned in every country sympathetic to the Nazis, including several countries in Latin America.
  • Communism: Eisenstein’s Battleship Potemkin (1925) was banned at various times in the United States, France, the UK, and even in its native Soviet Union. Abroad it was feared that the film might generate sympathies for communism, while in the USSR there was a fear it might incite riots against Stalin’s regime. Several other films deal with the darker sides of communism that are today all too easily forgotten: The Rabbit Is Me (1965), The Firemen’s Ball (1967), Z (1969), and The Witness (1969) were all banned for being anti-socialist, pessimistic, and revisionist attacks on the State.
  • Colonialism: Statues Also Die (1953) was critical of cultural colonialism and appropriation, a topic that French censors found problematic at the time and therefore banned the film. The Little Soldier (1960) ran into trouble with French censorship because of its allusions to the situation in Algeria and its denunciation of the use of force by both sides.
  • The Cold War: The official reason for banning The War Game (1965) from television broadcast was for excessive violence and depictions of human suffering, but it may have also been that the film went against the official government line concerning the survivability of nuclear attack.
  • Representation: Carnival in Flanders (1935) was banned in Belgium for the way it portrayed the Flemish community. Kuhle Wampe (1932) was banned because it depicted German society, the leadership, the legal system, and religion in unflattering ways.
  • Morality: Different from the Others (1919) was banned after a year, allowing it to be shown only to doctors and lawyers as a case-study of sexual deviancy. The Nazis eventually destroyed all prints and only one copy of the film is known to have survived. Indignant moralists condemned the surrealist love story L’âge d’or (1930) for attempting to corrupt the public both visually and spiritually. Peeping Tom (1960) was banned in Finland for excessive violence and its portrayal of sociopathic behaviour.
  • Religion: Andrei Rublev (1966) was banned in the USSR for its portrayal of religious themes. Ben-Hur (1959) and Persepolis (2007) were banned in the Arab world, one for being pro-Israeli and the other for being disrespectful of Iran and of Islam.
Alongside the main theme, the festival pays special tribute to timeless classics, many of them recently restored, which have left a lasting trace in the imagination of viewers worldwide, and which continue to inspire filmmakers. Jacques Tati, creator of the lovably bumbling comedic character Monsieur Hulot, inspired a style of visual comedy that was part slapstick and part social critique. Capturing the growing obsession with modernization and consumerism, Tati expressed anxieties about the isolating effect of cities transformed by technology and ultra-modern design, which rendered social relationships synthetic and superficial. His films are intriguing and uniquely entertaining, exploring themes of technology, commercialization, and the rise of consumer society with a deftly humorous touch. Tati was born in France of Russian lineage, a natural athlete who completed military service, had a semi-professional rugby career, and became a performance artist before serving again during the Second World War. After the war he resumed his work as a cabaret entertainer and appeared in several films before launching his own company Cady-Films, together with producer Fred Orain. We are pleased to bring you four recently restored Tati classics: The Big Day (1947), Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday (1953), Mon Oncle (1958, Best Foreign Language Film Oscar), and PlayTime (1967). Throughout these films we see the character of Monsieur Hulot take shape: an awkward, pipe-smoking, raincoat-wearing persona whose unassuming theatricality inevitably leads to hilariously catastrophic adventures. The feel-good movie selection of Frank Capra classics includes some of the most successful American films from the 1930s and ‘40s, including Oscar winners It Happened One Night (1934), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), You Can’t Take It with You (1938), Mr. Smith goes to Washington (1939), and It’s a Wonderful Life (1946). The restored and remastered versions of these films allow us to experience Capra’s style anew; his unobtrusive, naturalistic rhythm and improvisatory interaction between actors. Capra’s themes explore the wholesome goodness of human nature, the value of selflessness and hard work, and a feel-good celebration of the common man. Born in Italy, Capra was raised in working-class Los Angeles, which made his personal story of success a personification of the American dream. During World War II, Capra served in the U.S. Army Signals Corps and produced propaganda films, notably the Why We Fight series, but in the years following he became a pacifist and was openly critical of the Vietnam War. Using his celebrity status, he was unafraid to express himself in the idealized spirit of Western individualism, and his films reflected an idealized America that only he could imagine, where courage always triumphed over evil. StudioCanal has one of the largest film libraries in the world. Situated in France, this production and distribution company’s catalogue offers a long list of critically acclaimed international features and box office hits. Mandy (dir. Alexander Mackendrick, 1952), Quai des Orfèvres (dir. Henri-Georges Clouzot, 1947) and The Graduate (dir. Mike Nichols, 1967) were great successes and their production and reception histories mention little about the difficulties associated with producing studio features of that calibre. Though these films broke new ground when it came to issues of sexuality, infidelity, or disability, others have had a difficult time reaching the public. While not banned or censored in any strict sense, the remaining films in this section bear witness to some of the serious obstacles filmmakers encounter during the process of bringing a script to screen. For instance, The King and the Mockingbird (dir. Paul Grimault, 1980) is regarded today as an animation masterpiece, but it took nearly 30 years to complete due to conflicts of interest with the film’s producer. Equally, as one of the most iconoclastic and original directors working today, David Lynch has frequently met with producers’ opposition to his unorthodox artistic vision. Discounted as an incoherent dreamtime freakfest, Mulholland Drive (dir. David Lynch, 2001) was conceived as a TV pilot for a potential series, but when television executives rejected it, Lynch turned the project into a feature film, making it one of the greatest works of contemporary surrealism. The Special Screenings section features films from three very special festival affiliates: the Asian Film Archive (AFA), the Yangon Film School (YFS) and Gaumont. Ring of Fury (dir. Tony Yeow & James Sebastian, 1973), Provided by the Asian Film Archive (AFA), was banned in its home country for over 20 years because of its portrayal of gangsterism and vigilante self-defence during a time when Singapore was asserting itself as a modern state with effective law enforcement. Filmmakers Yeow and Sebastian saw it as their duty to act as the social conscience of the times, by contrasting popular aspiration and resilience—personified on-screen by eighth-dan world class karate master Peter Chong—with the deliberate complacency of a corrupt police force. The Asian Film Archive is a central institution in the preservation of Southeast Asia’s film heritage, and was instrumental in the restoration of My Darling (1950, in the Myanmar Film Treasures section). Sunrise (dir. Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, 1927) is perhaps not an example of a formally banned or censored film, but nonetheless, for many decades the film was unavailable to the public due to what may be called the censorship of technological progress. It was not until the 1990s, some sixty years after its initial release, that the film was deemed significant enough to undergo preservation, and another decade would pass before it was issued onto an accessible format. The last film in this section, Citizen Kane (dir. Orson Welles, 1941), was entangled in scandal and controversy from the beginning, and in spite of numerous awards (including an Oscar for best original screenplay), it would hound Welles for the rest of his career. Citizen Kane, one of the most watched and studied films in the history of filmmaking, was based on the real-life figure of William Randolph Hearst, a publishing magnate. Hearst was so enraged that he banned all mention of the film throughout his considerable media empire, confirming Welles’ commentary in the film about the vast the power and influence held by news and media corporations. Citizen Kane and Sunrise are presented as part of a Myanmar subtitling project undertaken by the Yangon Film School, with the financial support of the Goethe Institute. Concluding the selection is Daïnah la métisse (dir. Jean Grémillon. 1932), a Gaumont presentation. Established by French engineer and inventor Léon Gaumont in 1895, the Gaumont Film Company is the first and the oldest in the world, boasting nearly a thousand films in its impressive catalogue. Gaumont’s partnership with Memory! began last year, with an exhibition commemorating the 120-year long history of the company. This history is inextricably linked to the story of the moving image: this is where the industry’s first female director, Alice Guy-Blaché, began her career; Gaumont British produced Alfred Hitchcock’s early work; the company has persevered through the Great Depression, two world wars, technological and aesthetic revolutions, spurred back into production by the French New Wave movement, and proceeding to embrace transnational partnerships, cutting-edge technologies and global distribution methods. Daïnah la métisse is a brilliantly restored French classic from the 1930s, and was without a doubt ahead of its time both in narrative and aesthetic terms. Conference In the present times of economic, social, and political volatility, we can look at the past and compare: how were such issues coped with in previous decades? How do the banned or censored films of the past contribute to on-going debates about society and modernity? If new technologies and new media spark old anxieties, what might we learn from the media of the past, from its confrontations with official legislation and social codes? As film and other media of the past demonstrate, many important intellectual and artistic movements have developed under censorship in various countries over the years. In this sense, the conference will also explore how censorship has influenced cultural production and the creative process. How do we negotiate film and media under the enduring presence of various forms of censorship and rugged political environments? A first of its kind in Myanmar, this interdisciplinary conference aims to explore the idea of film censorship in a broad cultural context, inviting connections between various forms of censorship and across historical circumstances. We open the floor to Myanmar-based and international presenters to join us in addressing this topic from a variety of perspectives including case studies, theoretical investigations, problem-oriented arguments, and comparative analyses. Journalism & Culture Program Text to come Maha Bandula Park Screenings We have selected some of the finest heritage classics for a very special series of public open-air screenings. It wasn’t long ago that such events were not authorized, which is what makes the screenings at Maha Bandula Park a unique experience for many, and a major cultural event in Yangon. The public will have a chance to see Franck Capra’s feel-good family drama It’s a Wonderful Life (1946); The Great Dictator (1940, subtitled in Myanmar), in which the comedy genius of Charles Chaplin takes over the world; My Darling (Pyo Chit Lin, 1950), a freshly restored Myanmar classic; and lastly, four clowning shorts starring the “great stone face” of Buster Keaton. Memory! extends a special thanks to the municipal authorities of the city of Yangon, for their invaluable support in enabling us to bring these classics to the public. Children’s Program I Have a Dream Maha Bandula Park – November 4th and 5th This program for disfranchised kids has been designed by the MEMORY! Cinema Association along with the Shakespeare School and Myanmar Mobile Education (myME). Over the course of two days, youngsters aged from 8 to 14 will be introduced to film making and coached to create their first short film around the theme “I have a dream”. The films will be shot with phones and screened on the giant outdoor screen in Maha Bandula Park on Monday, November 6th. MEMORY! Corner Text to come  


October 29, 2017

MEMORY! Film Festival 2017

Censorship & Film Conference A Southeast Asian perspective

In the present times of economic, social, and political volatility, we can look at the past and compare: how were such issues coped with in previous decades? How do the banned or censored films of the past contribute to on-going debates about society and modernity? If new social conditions, technologies, or ideologies spark old anxieties, what might we learn from the media of the past, from its confrontations with official regulations or social codes? As film and other media of the past demonstrate, many important intellectual and artistic movements have developed under censorship in various countries over the years. In this sense, the conference will explore how censorship has influenced cultural production and the creative process. How do we negotiate film and media under the enduring presence of various forms of censorship and rugged political environments? A first of its kind in Myanmar, this interdisciplinary conference aims to explore the idea of film censorship in a broad cultural context, inviting connections between various forms of censorship and across historical circumstances. We open the floor to Myanmar-based and international presenters to join us in addressing this topic from a variety of perspectives including case studies, theoretical investigations, problem-oriented arguments, and comparative analyses. Conference organizers:
Dr. Paul Douglas Grant Professor, Graduate Cinema Studies School of Architecture Fine Arts and Design University of San Carlos Cebu, Philippines Theo Stojanov PhD Candidate Film & Moving Image Studies Concordia University Montreal, Canada
[Call for Participation] [Full Conference Program] [Schedule]

Schedule

Censorship & Film Conference: A Southeast Asian perspective Nov. 4       Sule Shangri-la Hotel, 5 floor 09:30

Coffee & refreshments

10:00

Opening keynote: Artistic freedom in modern democracies H.E. Kristian Schmidt, European Union Ambassador to Myanmar

10:35

Panel 1: Censorship and Screen Media Policy Chair: Theo Stojanov – PhD candidate, Film & Moving Image Studies, Concordia University – Canada

Past, Present & Future of Myanmar Censorship U Thein Naing, Director of Myanmar Censorship Board (MMPDB) Grace Swe Zin Htaik, Actress & Secretary of the International Relations Committee (MMPDB) – Myanmar

Film Censorship: What is It? Dr. Howard Besser, Professor of Film Studies at NYU – USA

Censorship law & contemporary filmmaking in Myanmar Thaiddi, Filmmakers and Co-founders of Wathann Film Festival – Myanmar

Q&A

Nov. 5       Sule Shangri-la Hotel, 5 floor 09:30

Coffee & refreshments

10:00

Panel 2: Censorship and Southeast Asian Filmmaking Chair: Dr. Paul Grant

Independent filmmaking, the Yangon Film School perspective Ma Shin Daewe, filmmaker, Yangon Film School – Myanmar

Indonesian censorship in the 1980s Manshur Zikri, researcher, critic, curator, Forum Lenteng – Indonesia

Orapronobis Patrick Campos, critic and Assistant Professor, University of the Philippines – Philippines

The Malaysian Film Censorship System: Key Issues and Concerns Dr. Saw Tiong Guan, filmmaker and Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law, University of Malaya – Malaysia

Banning To Singapore, with Love: the Aftermath Tan Pin Pin, producer, director – Singapore

11:45

Q&A

12:20

Closing remarks: Dr. Paul D. Grant, Professor of Film Studies at University of San Carlos – Philippines

 

Participants

Kristian Schmidt European Union Ambassador to Myanmar – EU Opening keynote: “Artistic freedom in modern democracies” Kristian Schmidt is the European Union Ambassador to Myanmar and Head of the EU Delegation in Yangon since September 2017. He previously served as EU Ambassador to Uganda and held several senior positions in the field of development cooperation and humanitarian aid at the European Commission in Brussels. Kristian Schmidt studied economics in Copenhagen, Denmark, Bologna, Italy and Aix-en-Provence, France, and holds a degree in international relations from the University of Cambridge, UK. Ambassador Schmidt is a Danish national.   U Thein Naing Director of Myanmar Censorship Board (MCB) – Myanmar Grace Swe Zin Htaik Actress & Secretary of the International Relations Committee (MCB) “Past, Present & Future of Myanmar Censorship” Grace Swe Zin Htaik is a Myanmar Academy Award-winning actress and U Thein Naing is Director of the Myanmar Censorship Board. In front of the camera, or as a producer and director, Grace has worked on an impressive number of locally distributed film and video productions. In 1977 she won the Burmese Academy Award for best performance. She attended the Rangoon Institute of Economics, graduating in 1977 with a bachelor’s degree in commerce. Subsequently she obtained a degree from the Alliance Française in Yangon in 1989, and trained in special content media at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles) in 2002. She received a superior diploma from the International Institute of Abhidhamma, Yangon, in 2011. Heading International Affairs at Myanmar Motion Picture Organization (MMPO), she acts as a liaison between the government and visiting production teams. In this role, she has participated at many international film-related events, symposiums, workshops and seminars around the world. In addition to her work in film, she is also involved with Population Services International, an INGO focusing on HIV/AIDS education in Myanmar. Since 2007, she is Ambassador for Peace for the New-York-based Universal Peace Federation   Howard Besser Professor of Film Studies at New York University – USA “Film Censorship: What is It?” Dr. Howard Besser is Professor of Cinema Studies at New York University (the first Cinema Studies Department in North America). He is also the Founding Director of NYU’s Masters degree in Moving Image Archiving & Preservation, and Professor Emeritus at UCLA’s Library School. He has taught and written about policy impediments that keep films from being seen, and is particularly interested in how copyright, privacy, and censorship are used to inhibit film distribution. In 2009 Besser was named to the Library of Congress’ select list of “Pioneers of Digital Preservation.” He has also been involved in the creation of several library metadata standards (PREMIS, Dublin Core, METS), and has published more than 50 articles dealing with media and information technology in cultural institutions.   Ma Shin Daewe Documentary filmmaker, Yangon Film School – Myanmar “Independent filmmaking, the Yangon Film School perspective” Shin Daewe is one of Myanmar’s documentary pioneers. Born in Yangon in 1973, Shin Daewe began writing articles and poems during her studies at university. When Myanmar’s universities were closed in the wake of student protests in 1996, she joined Yangon production company AV Media where she soon discovered her passion for documentary. In 2006 she took up studies at Yangon Film School where she quickly became one of the School’s most prolific filmmakers. Many of her works – such as her portrait of the Burmese painter Rahula, An Untitled Life, and Now I am Thirteen, about a young girl living in Myanmar’s dry zone – have screened to acclaim at numerous film festivals around the world. Several films, including A Bright Future about child-centred teaching and Take Me Home, about IDP camps in Kachin, have also won awards. With 10 short documentaries to her credit, Shin Daewe is currently developing a feature-length documentary about opium farmers in Shan State as part of the Yangon Film School’s Fellowship programme. She is also a regular directing mentor on YFS courses and a member of the School’s Steering Committee.   Manshur Zikri Forum Lenteng – Indonesia “Indonesian censorship in the 1980s” Manshur Zikri is a researcher, critic and curator in the field of media, arts and films. He earned his bachelor’s degree in 2014 from University of Indonesia in Criminology. Since 2009, he is a member of Forum Lenteng, a Jakarta-based egalitarian and non-profit organization which focuses on cultural activism as well as alternative education on media, films and arts.   Patrick Campos Film Theorist & Critic – Philippines “Orapronobis” Patrick F. Campos is an independent film critic and an Assistant Professor at the Film Institute of the University of the Philippines (UP), where he received the 2017 Chancellor’s Award for outstanding professor. He is author of books and articles on Philippine and Southeast Asian cinemas, media, and popular culture, and his latest book is The End of National Cinema: Filipino Film at the Turn of the Century (2016), which was recently nominated for the National Book Awards (Philippines) for Best Book on Art. He is editor of two leading journals on art and media in the Philippines, namely Humanities Diliman and Plaridel: A Journal on Media, Communication, and Society; director of the Office of Research and Publication of the College of Mass Communication of UP, and a current member of the cinema committee of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA).   Saw Tiong Guan Senior Lecturer in Law & Documentary Filmmaker – Malaysia “The Malaysian Film Censorship System: Key Issues and Concerns” Dr. Saw Tiong Guan is Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law, University of Malaya. His doctoral dissertation from the University of Melbourne is entitled The Final Cut: Film Censorship in Malaysia, Hong Kong and Australia. A keen lover of film since a young age (he worked in a video store while still in high school in the 1990s) Tiong Guan is also a filmmaker. In 2007 he wrote and directed his first film entitled G16 G17, a short film about a boy’s struggles to organize a screening in an abandoned dilapidated cinema for his ailing mother. In 2013, he produced and directed Past Present, a documentary film exploring Tsai Ming-Liang’s journey through film, both as a film-goer and maker, tracing Tsai’s philosophy as a director to his childhood memories. In 2016, Tiong Guan directed Wind with cinematographer Christopher Doyle.   Tan Pin Pin Producer / Director – Singapore “Banning To Singapore, with Love: the Aftermath” Director Tan Pin Pin is Singapore’s foremost documentary director. She chronicles and questions the gaps in history, memory and documentation. Her films study the process of self-examination itself, rendering its complexities with emotional power and visual clarity. They have screened at the leading festivals including the Berlinale, Hot Docs, Busan, Cinéma du Réel, Visions du Réel, SXSW and at the Flaherty Seminar. The Singaporean director has won or been nominated for more than 20 awards, most recently for her 2013 feature To Singapore, with Love (banned in Singapore) from Dubai International Film Festival. Previously, Invisible City (2007) won the Scam International Award at Cinéma du Réel. Singapore GaGa (2005) was voted Best Film, 2006, by Singapore’s The Straits Times. In Time to Come (2017) is her latest feature documentary, it currently being released in Singapore, as well as screening at festivals.   Thaiddhi Filmmaker and Co-founder of Wathann Film Festival – Myanmar “Censorship law & contemporary filmmaking in Myanmar” Thaiddhi is a freelance filmmaker working on both documentary and fiction films, and has completed projects for local and international NGOs in locations all over Myanmar. His directorial debut Awake won the FAMU International Film award in 2009. Thu Thu Shein, Director of Wathann Film Festival is a graduate of the Myanmar National University of Arts and Culture’s Cinema and Drama program. On the film scene since 2005, her directorial debut A Million Threads won the Heinrich Boell Foundation Documentary Award in 2007. She has worked as either director or cinematographer on a number of productions. Thaiddhi and Thu Thu Shein run Third Floor Productions, which provides production services to local and international organizations and supports the development of independent filmmakers. Thaiddhi and Thu Thu Shein co-founded the Wathann film Festival in 2010, and since then it has become one of the principle Myanmar organizations to support film education and media development in Myanmar. The first festival to promote independent film production in Myanmar, its educational program and workshops intend to train a new generation of Myanmar filmmakers in the diverse professions of the film industry.   Paul D. Grant Professor of Film Studies at University of San Carlos – Philippines Closing remarks Dr. Paul Grant teaches graduate cinema studies at the University of San Carlos, co-chairs the School of Architecture Fine Arts and Design Research Committee and is vice-president of CAMIRA (Cinema and Moving Image Research Assembly). He is the author of “Cinéma Militant: Political Filmmaking and May 1968,” co-author of “Lilas: An Illustrated History of the Golden Ages of Cebuano Cinema,” editor in chief of Sinekultura Film Journal, and editor at La Furia Umana journal. He has translated work by French film critic Serge Daney and Film theoretician Jean-Louis Schefer, and his writing has appeared in, among others, La Furia Umana, Situations: Project of the Radical Imagination, Film International, Philippine Quarterly of Culture and Society and Senses of Cinema. He is currently editing a collection of writing on Visayan cinema by the late D.M. Estabaya and a monograph on Philippine regional cinemas.


October 27, 2017
  BANNED M Myanmar subtitles
  GUEST G Introduction by Guest
  JACQUES TATI K Film for Kids
  FRANK CAPRA    
  STUDIO CANAL    
  MYANMAR TREASURES    
SPECIAL SCREENINGS    
  M! CORNER    

[catalogue]

You may wish to look at the catalogue introduction for a more detailed description of the various sections.

DATES

EVENT

 

 

DURATION

VENUE

Nov 3rd

Friday

 

 

 

 

 6:00 pm

Opening Ceremony: My Darling (Pyo Chit Lin) by Tin Myint

 

M

1h20

Waziya Cinema

Nov 4th

Saturday

 

 

 

 

9:30 AM

Statues Also Die by Chris Marker & Alain Resnais

 

 

30′

Waziya Cinema

10:00 AM

Invisible City by Tan Pin Pin

 

G

1h

Waziya Cinema

10:00 AM

Conference: Censorship and Screen Media Policy

 

 

2h

Sule Shangri-la

11:00 AM

Journey to the West by Tsai Ming-liang

 

G

56′

Nay Pyi Taw Cinema

12:00 PM

The Emerald Jungle (Mya Ga Naing) by Maung Tin Maung

 

 

1h37

Waziya Cinema

2:00 PM

To Singapore, With Love by Tan Pin Pin

 

G

1h10

Waziya Cinema

3.30 PM

Goodbye Dragon Inn by Tsai Ming-liang

 

G

1h24

Nay Pyi Taw Cinema

5:00 PM

Wathann Film Festival Selection: The Clinic, My Grandfather’s House, Next Month

 

G

38′

Waziya Cinema

6:00 PM

Playtime by Jacques Tati

 

GK

2h04

Mahabandoola Park

Nov 5th

Sunday

 

 

 

 

9:00 AM

Siti by Eddie Cahyono

 

G

1h35

Waziya Cinema

10:00 AM

Conference: Censorship and Southeast Asian Filmmaking

 

 

3h

Sule Shangri-la

11:00 AM

Afternoon by Tsai Ming-liang

 

G

2h17

Waziya Cinema

1:30 PM

Ring of Fury by Tony Yeow & James Sebastian

 

G

1h18

Waziya Cinema

3:00 PM

Tristana by Luis Bunuel

 

G

1h39

Waziya Cinema

5:00 PM

Kuhle Wampe by Slatan Dudow

 

 

1h09

Waziya Cinema

5:00 PM

No No Sleep by Tsai Ming-liang  

 

G

34′

Nay Pyi Taw Cinema

6:00 PM

The Great Dictator by Charlie Chaplin

 

KM

2h05

Mahabandoola Park

Nov 6th

Monday

 

 

 

 

9:00 AM

The Witness by Peter Bacso

 

 

1h43

Waziya Cinema

11:00 AM

Stray Dogs by Tsai Ming-liang

 

G

2h18

Waziya Cinema

1:30 PM

Past Present by Saw Tiong Guan

 

G

1h16

Waziya Cinema

3:30 PM

I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone by Tsai Ming-liang

 

G

1h58

Nay Pyi Taw Cinema

5:00 PM

In Time to Come by Tan Pin Pin

 

 

1h02

Waziya Cinema

6:00 PM

My Darling (Pyo Chit Lin) by Tin Myint

 

M

1h20

Mahabandoola Park

7:00 PM

Different from the Others by Richard Oswald

 

 

51′

Waziya Cinema

Nov 7th

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

10:00 AM

The King & the Mockingbird by Paul Grimault

 

K

1h27

Waziya Cinema

12:00 PM

L’Age d’or by Luis Bunuel

 

 

1h03

Waziya Cinema

1:00 PM

Dainah la métisse by Jean Grémillon

 

 

51′

Waziya Cinema

2:00 PM

Ice Poison by Midi Z

 

G

1h35

Waziya Cinema

4:00 PM

Mr. Smith goes to Washington by Frank Capra

 

 

2h09

Waziya Cinema

6:00 PM

Mr Hulot’s Holiday by Jacques Tati

 

K

1h27

Waziya Cinema

8:00 PM

It’s a Wonderful Life by Frank Capra

 

 

2h15

Waziya Cinema

Nov 8th

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

10:00 AM

One Two Three by Billy Wilder

 

 

1h51

Waziya Cinema

12:00 PM

The Men Who Tread on the Tiger’s Tail by Kurosawa Akira

 

 

1h

Waziya Cinema

1:00 PM

The Rabbit Is Me by Kurt Maetzig

 

 

1h49

Waziya Cinema

3:00 PM

The War Game by Peter Watkins

 

 

2h01

Waziya Cinema

5:00 PM

Andreï Rublev by Andrei Tarkovski

 

 

3h25

Waziya Cinema

Nov 9th

Thursday

 

 

 

 

10:00 AM

Jour de fête by Jacques Tati

 

K

1h26

Waziya Cinema

12:00 PM

Arsenic and Old Lace by Frank Capra

 

 

1h58

Waziya Cinema

2:00 PM

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

 

K

1h36

Waziya Cinema

4:00 PM

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town by Frank Capra

 

 

1h55

Waziya Cinema

6:00 PM

Mon oncle by Jacques Tati

 

 

1h56

Waziya Cinema

8:00 PM

Cool Hand Luke by Stuart Rosenberg

 

 

2h06

Waziya Cinema

Nov 10th

Friday

 

 

 

 

9:30 AM

All Quiet On the Western Front by Lewis Milestone

 

 

2h13

Waziya Cinema

12:00 PM

It Happened One Night by Frank Capra

 

 

1h45

Waziya Cinema

2:00 PM

Mandy by Alexander Mackendrick

 

 

1h33

Waziya Cinema

4:00 PM

Le petit soldat by Jean-Luc Godard

 

 

1h28

Waziya Cinema

6:00 PM

Mulholland Drive by David Lynch

 

 

2h27

Waziya Cinema

Nov 11th

Saturday

 

 

 

 

10:00 AM

Battleship Potemkin by Sergei Eisenstein

 

 

1h11

Waziya Cinema

12:00 PM

You Can’t Take It With You by Frank Capra

 

 

2h06

Waziya Cinema

2:00 PM

Sunrise by Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau

 

M

1h35

Waziya Cinema

4:00 PM

The Graduate by Mike Nichols

 

 

1h46

Waziya Cinema

6:00 PM

Ben Hur by Willian Wyler

 

 

3h42

Waziya Cinema

Nov 12th

Sunday

 

 

 

 

10:00 AM

Carnival in Flanders by Jacques Feyder

 

 

1h49

Waziya Cinema

12.00 PM

Z by Costa Gavras

 

 

2h07

Waziya Cinema

2:00 PM

Firemen’s Ball by Milos Forman

 

 

1h11

Waziya Cinema

4:00 PM

Quai des orfèvres by Henri-Georges Clouzot

 

 

1h46

Waziya Cinema

6:00 PM

Citizen Kane by Orson Welles

 

M

1h59

Waziya Cinema

8:00 PM

Peeping Tom by Michael Powell

 

 

1h41

Waziya Cinema

http://www.memoryfilmfestival.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/M2017venues.gif


October 25, 2017

[schedule]

You may also wish to look at the catalogue introduction for a more detailed description of the various sections.

# | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | W | Y | Z

 

#

 

28

Prasanna Jayakody Sri Lanka – 2014 – 98 min. Abasiri and his nephew Mani are summoned to Colombo to identify the body of a woman who turns out to be to Abasiri’s estranged wife. Desparate for answers, Abasiri embarks on a bizarre journey back to his native village. With the coffin attached to the hood of an old ice cream truck, Abasiri and Mani drive through mesmerizing landscapes to confront the villagers with their own hypocrisy.    

A

 

A Letter to the President

(Namai Ba Rahis Gomhor) Roya Sadat Afghanistan – 2017 – 83 min. As the hour nears Soraya’s execution, the president is reading her letter pleading for a pardon. Unaware of their mother’s fate, her children play in the garden, while Behzad, her colleague, is torn with guilt, as he is the one responsible for all her troubles. Will the letter convince the president to grant her pardon even if it goes against the court’s ruling?    

Afternoon

Tsai Ming-liang Taiwan – 2015 – 137 min. Contemporary Taiwanese cinema’s pre-eminent auteur-actor partnership is examined at leisure, with the director’s signature long-take gaze turned in on himself and on his beloved leading man Lee Kang-sheng. The two open up about creative methods, sexuality, cooking, and travel; a film in four static shots set amid the improvised pastoral beauty of a ramshackle rural house.    

All quiet on the western front

Lewis Milestone USA – 1930 – 133 min. A group of German schoolboys are talked into enlisting at the beginning of World War I by a nationalistic teacher. As the young men witness death and mutilation happening all around them, any preconceptions about “enemy” and “friend” are lost in the chaos of combat. This story is not about heroism but about the drudgery of war, as fantasies of military glory give way to tragic reality.

 

Andrei Rublev

(Андрей Рублёв) Andrei Tarkovski USSR – 1966 – 205 min. In medieval Russia, a peace-seeking monk drifts from place to place in tumultuous times, eventually gaining a reputation for his icon painting. After Rublev witnesses a brutal battle and unintentionally becomes involved, he takes a vow of silence and spends time away from his art. To ease his troubled soul, he must become a painter once again.    

Arsenic & Old Lace

Franck Capra USA – 1944 – 90 min. Mortimer Brewster is a newly married newspaperman. When he takes a quick trip home to announce the good news to his two maiden aunts, he discovers their very odd hobby: luring and killing lonely old men, and then burying them in the cellar. It gets worse.    

B

 

Battleship Potemkin

(Бронено́сец «Потёмкин») Sergei Eisenstein USSR – 1925 – 75 min. 1905. News of mutiny aboard the Potemkin reaches Odessa as the battleship sails into port. The mini-revolution on board spills onto the streets as citizens, tired of abuse from the imperial regime, want to show their support for their brethren on board. The Tzar’s army marches on the crew recklessly trampling any civilians that are caught along the way.    

Ben-Hur

Willian Wyler USA – 1959 – 236 min. Judah Ben-Hur is a Jewish prince in Roman Jerusalem. His adopted brother Messala, a Roman, returns to Judea as a military commander. They are happy to reunite but soon their differences taint the relationship. Judah is falsely accused of treason and sentenced to become a galley slave. After years at sea he returns to his homeland to seek revenge, but finds redemption.    

The Big Day

(Jour de Fête) Jacques Tati France – 1949 – 79 min. After seeing a newsreel praising the U.S. Postal Service, provincial postman François regrets the disorganized and backwards ways of his profession in France. The newsreel shows mail delivered by airplane or helicopter, while François has but nothing but a rusty old bicycle. Obsessed with improving speed and efficiency, François is starting to do things “the American way.”    

The Boat

Buster Keaton USA – 1921 – 23 min. A sailing trip proves to be one disaster after another when Buster and his family decide to go on a voyage on his homemade boat.    

C

 

Carnival in Flanders

(La kermesse héroïque) Jacques Feyder France – 1935 – 109 min. During the Spanish occupation of Flanders, a Duke and his troops march on the village of Boon. The four village guards promptly desert their posts while the Mayor plays dead. Only the Mayor’s wife has the presence of mind to organize the townswomen to greet the invaders and to preserve the peace using their feminine wiles.    

Citizen Kane

Orson Welles USA – 1941 – 119 min. Multimillionaire newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies alone in his extravagant mansion, Xanadu, speaking a single word: ‘Rosebud’. In an attempt to figure out the meaning of this word, a reporter tracks down the people who worked and lived with Kane; they tell their stories in a series of flashbacks that reveal much about Kane’s life but not enough to unlock the riddle of his dying breath.    

The Clinic

Ko Jeu, Aung Min, The Maw Naing Myanmar – 2013 – 20 min. An ethnographic documentary about a village doctor who, while in university, preferred to hang out with the poets rather than attend anatomy class.    

Convict 13

Buster Keaton USA – 1920 – 19 min. A young golfer is mugged by an escaped convict and finds himself in a prison where he foils a jailbreak.    

Cool Hand Luke

Stuart Rosenberg USA – 1967 – 127 min. Luke Jackson, a guy with more guts than brains, refuses to buckle under to authority and keeps trying to escape from prison camp. Idolized by his fellow convicts, Luke’s bravado in the face of adversity makes him both a hero and a villain in the rural prison. But how long will it take before the prison staff succeed in crushing his spirit?    

D

 

Daïnah la métisse

Jean Grémillon France – 1932 – 51 min. Mr. Smith, a black magician, and his beautiful wife Dainah, of mixed race, embark on a luxury ocean liner bound for the colonies. At a dance party one evening, Dainah provokes the passionate but unwanted advances of Michaux, the mechanic on board. When steps outside on the bridge for some air, Michaux assaults her but she pushes him away and bites his arm. The next day, as the Captain shows her around the liner she recognizes her assailant by his bandaged arm.    

Different from the Others

(Anders als die Andern) Richard Oswald Germany – 1919 – 51 min. Paul Korner is a homosexual musician who falls in love with his protégé Kurt. The two are seen walking hand in hand by the blackmailer Franz. Paul agrees to do as Franz demands at first, but the extortion gets out of hand. When he refuses to pay any more hush money, the danger of discovery has dire consequences for the lovers.    

E

 

Emerald Jungle

‘A1’ Maung Tin Maung Myanmar – 1934 – min. Deep in the jungle, where tigers, snakes and elephants are at home, U Pho Thwa owns a sawmill. With his delightful granddaughter Myint Myint he lives a little further off in a comfortable villa. One day, when Myint Myint takes her horse for a ride she is thrown from the saddle and saved by a good-looking young man from Rangoon.    

F

   

The Firemen’s Ball

(Hoří, má panenko) Milos Forman Czechoslovakia – 1967 – 71 min. The volunteer fire department in a small town is throwing a ball in honor of a retired fire-chief’s 86th birthday party. The whole town is invited but things don’t go as planned. Someone is stealing the lottery prizes and the contestants for the Miss Fire-Department beauty contest are neither willing to participate nor particularly beautiful.    

G

 

Goodbye, Dragon Inn

Tsai Ming-liang Taiwan – 2003 – 84 min. A Japanese tourist takes refuge from a rainstorm inside a once-popular movie theatre, a decrepit old barn of a cinema that is screening a martial arts classic, King Hu’s 1966 “Dragon Inn.” Even with the rain bucketing down outside, it doesn’t pull in much of an audience; those who have turned up are less interested in the movie than in the chance of meeting a stranger in the dark.    

The Graduate

Mike Nichols USA – 1967 – 106 min. Ben has recently graduated from college and his parents expect great things from him. At his “welcome home” party, Mrs. Robinson, the wife of his father’s business partner asks Ben to drive her home and the two begin a fleeting affair. This becomes a problem when Ben finds himself falling for Elaine, Mrs. Robinson’s daughter.    

The Great Dictator

Charlie Chaplin USA – 1940 – 120 min. A clumsy Jewish soldier saves the life of pilot Schultz but loses his memory. Released from the hospital years later, the former amnesia patient walks into his old barber shop in the ghetto and reopens it as if nothing had ever happened. But times have changed in the country of Tomania: Dictator Hynkel, who looks uncannily like the barber, has laid his merciless grip on the country.    

H

The Hole

Tsai Ming-liang Taiwan – 1999 – 95 min. In this musical drama, the authorities issue an evacuation order after a strange disease begins spreading throughout Taiwan, but some choose to stay behind. During a plumbing repair job, a small hole drilled in the floor remains unrepaired and eventually comes through the ceiling of the apartment below, leading to a deal of tension between the occupants.    

I

 

I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone

Tsai Ming-liang Taiwan – 2006 – 118 min. When an immigrant day laborer is badly beaten by thugs, and a young man nurses him back to health with the occasional help from a waitress living upstairs. Violence is a constant threat: they find another man abandoned in the street, paralyzed. Speaking little, ambient sounds dominate the lonely night. We peer down hallways, through doors and alleyways. Who sleeps with whom?    

Ice Poison

冰毒 Midi Z Taiwan – 2014 – 95 min. A farmer and his son can barely survive on their meagre harvest. Pawning the cow for a moped, the son hopes to earn a living as a taxi driver. His first customer is Sanmei, who has returned to Myanmar to bury her grandfather. She decides not to go back to an arranged marriage in China and begins a new life as a drug runner, persuading the young man to be her driver.    

In Time to Come

Tan Pin Pin Singapore – 2017 – 62 min. The filmmaker documents the simultaneous depositing of a time capsule filled with present-day objects and the opening of an old one which reveals strange objects from the past. By making the present uncanny, this film draws a surreal portrait a country in which destruction and conservation develop at an equal pace.    

Invisible City

Tan Pin Pin Singapore – 2007 – 60 min. Invisible City is a documentary about the atrophy of memory, which attempts to sketch out a Singapore that exists only through the memories and artefacts of photographers, journalists, and archaeologists: the “City that could have been.”    

It Happened One Night

Franck Capra USA – 1934 – 105 min. Ellie Andrews has just tied the knot with socialite aviator King Westley when she is whisked away to her father’s yacht and out of King’s clutches. Ellie gets away from daddy and runs back towards her husband. Along the way, she must reluctantly accept the help of unemployed reporter Peter Warne, who senses a juicy newspaper story. After some time together they begin to fall in love.    

It’s a Wonderful Life

Franck Capra USA – 1946 – 130 min. George Bailey is overwhelmed by family and work obligations and a sense that this is not the life he wanted to live. Dreams and opportunities pass him by. When a serious financial discrepancy puts George on the brink of despair, he contemplates ending it all. An angel is sent from Heaven to show him how much more complicated life would have been for his dear ones had he never existed.    

J

  Journey to the West (Walker Series) Tsai Ming-liang Taiwan – 2014 – 56 min. The walking monk acquires an unexpected acolyte in the form of French actor Denis Lavant as he makes his way through the streets of a sun-dappled Marseille.    

K

The King and the Mockingbird

(Le Roi et l’oiseau) Paul Grimault France – 1980 – 87 min. A heartless ruler kills the wife a bird during a hunt. This bird tells us the story of the king’s hopeless love for a simple shepherdess who is in love with a chimney sweep. Try as he might, the king cannot win her affection and so he marries her by force and condemns the bird and the chimney sweep to mindless industrial work. The oppressed subjects rally together and freedom triumphs.    

Kuhle Wampe oder: Wem gehört die Welt?

(Kuhle Wampe or Who Owns the World?) Slatan Dudow GDR – 1932 – 69 min. In the wake of the Great Depression, a working-class family struggles to make ends meet. After Anni’s brother commits suicide out of desperation, her family is evicted and forced to move to Kuhle Wampe, a homeless camp in the outskirts of Berlin. When Anni gets pregnant, her boyfriend Fritz promises to marry her, but he calls off the wedding after the party.    

L

 

L’âge d’or

Luis Bunuel France – 1930 – 60 min. A surrealist tale of a man and a woman passionately in love with one another, whose attempts to consummate that passion are continuously thwarted by their families, the Church, and bourgeois society.    

Leaf on a Pillow

(Daun di Atas Bantal) Garin Nugroho Indonesia – 1998 – 83 min. The film follows three orphans, Sugeng, Heru, and Kancil (played by themselves), in their day-to-day lives in Yogyakarta. They dream to rise above their poverty someday, by leading simple, moral lives under the occasional care of Asih, a kind saleswoman. But things do not go smoothly for the street children as they fall prey to their cruel environment.    

The Little Soldier

(Le petit soldat) Jean-Luc Godard France – 1960 – 88 min. During the Algerian war for independence from France, a young Frenchman living in Geneva who belongs to a right-wing terrorist group and a young woman who belongs to a left-wing terrorist group meet and fall in love. Complications ensue when the man is suspected by the members of his terrorist group of being a double agent.    

Lumière & Company

Collectif France – 1995 – 88 min. 40 international directors were asked to make a short film using the original Cinematographe invented by the Lumière Brothers, working under conditions similar to those of 1895. There were three rules: (1) The film could be no longer than 52 seconds, (2) no synchronized sound was permitted, and (3) no more than three takes. The results run the gamut from Zhang Yimou’s convention-thwarting joke to David Lynch’s bizarre miniature epic.    

M

 

Mandy

Alexander Mackendrick UK – 1952 – 93 min. Mandy’s parents are worried about the future: their little girl is deaf and mute and the world can be an unaccommodating place. When mother and daughter meet the enthusiastic Searle, he encourages Mandy to enrol into his specialized school where she is exposed to the latest methods for coping her disability. Optimistic, the family is ready to step into the unknown.    

Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts

Mouly Surya Indonesia – 2017 – 90 min. In the remote hills of an Indonesian island, Marlina, a young widow, is attacked and robbed for her cattle. To defend herself, she kills several of the thieves. Seeking justice, she goes on a journey of empowerment and redemption. But the road is long and especially perilous when the ghosts of her victims begin to haunt her.    

The Men Who Tread on the Tiger’s Tail

(虎の尾を踏む男達) Akira Kurosawa Japan – 1945 – 60 min. In medieval Japan, lord Yoshitsune successfully defeats the Shogun’s enemies. The Shogun, fearful of the warlord’s growing influence, calls for his arrest. Now fugitive, Yoshitsune and his samurai move through the countryside disguised as monks to stay one step ahead of the massive manhunt mounted to apprehend them.    

Mon Oncle

Jacques Tati France – 1958 – 117 min. The hopeless Monsieur Hulot once again finds himself affecting people’s lives without realizing what he is doing. Hulot’s young nephew lives in an ultra-modern house where his pretentious mother barely lets him breathe. Uncle and the boy get along famously, but the parents are concerned that Hulot might be a bad influence, and try to distract him with unintentionally hilarious results.    

Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday

(Les vacances de Monsieur Hulot) Jacques Tati France – 1953 – 114 min. The summer holidays are here and the bumbling Monsieur Hulot, along with everyone else, heads to a seaside resort. Just about everything he touches goes bad, but he is oblivious to the havoc he creates wherever he goes. Whether it is eating in the dining room, painting a boat, or playing tennis, his life is an adventure for everyone around him.    

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town

Franck Capra USA – 1936 – 115 min. Longfellow Deeds is a small town tuba player. When he suddenly inherits a great fortune, Longfellow moves to the big city with his tuba, where he becomes a reluctant focus of attention. Babe Bennett, a hot-shot reporter, figures the best way to get close to him is to pose as a damsel in distress. When small-town boy meets big-city girl anything can, and does, happen.  

Mr. Smith goes to Washington

Franck Capra USA – 1939 – 129 min. Jeffrey Smith believes that children are the future and deserve immediate government funding. When he is appointed to fill a vacancy in the U.S. Senate by manipulative party bosses, his idealistic plans promptly collide with political corruption, but he doesn’t back down.    

Mulholland Dr.

David Lynch USA – 2001 – 147 min. After hiring a hitman to kill her lover Camilla, Diane dreams of a different Hollywood experience. One where she is a wonderfully talented actress, Betty, becoming almost instantly successful. Another actress, Rita, loses her memory after an accident and misses the role of a lifetime. When Betty and Rita’s stories begins to intermingle with the reality of Diane and Camilla’s nightmarish relationship, the walls of the dream begin to collapse.    

My Darling

Tin Myint Myanmar – 1950 – 80 min. Two friends come to Yangon to look for work. They meet a young and beautiful woman who lives with her aunt since her parents passed away. Though she is rich, she is humble and works as mere staff at her own company. Nonetheless she draws the attentions of an air force captain, a police officer, and a writer.    

My Grandfather’s House

Shunn Lei Swe Yee Myanmar – 2013 – 14 min. Thakhin Htein Win’s granddaughter reminisces about the old Wooden house where she grew up – a house which was once a meeting place for some of the architects of Myanmar’s independence movement, in which her grandfather played a pivotal role.    

N

 

Next Month

Soe Moe Aung Myanmar – 2013 – 4 min. Best Short Film Award, Wathann Film Festival 2013 This is a story about a family in harmony with their predicament. It is difficult to prove whether any one among them is guilty or innocent. But the situation cannot be all too good.    

No No Sleep

(Walker Series) Tsai Ming-liang Taiwan – 2015 – 34 min. The Walker’s tortuous journey continues in Tokyo. Breaking away from the monk, we follow a sexually charged encounter that is a new element in the meditative series.    

O

 

One Two Three

Billy Wilder USA – 1961 – 111 min. MacNamara is a managing director for Coca-Cola in West Berlin in 1961, just before the building of the Wall. When tasked with entertaining Scarlett, the boss’ daughter, MacNamara finds out that the spoiled socialite is dating an East German communist named Otto, and goes to extreme lengths to conceal this from his boss in order to save his job.    

One Week

Buster Keaton USA – 1920 – 25 min. A newly wedded couple attempts to build a house from a prefabricated kit, unaware that a someone has sabotaged the kit’s component numbering.    

P

Past Present

Saw Tiong Guan Malaysia – 2013 – 76 min. A contemplative trip down memory lane along with Tsai Ming-liang, one of the leading voices of the Second New Wave of Taiwanese Cinema. Saw Tiong Guan establishes a very personal bond with his subject, which alongside interviews with many of the filmmaker’s colleagues complete this portrait of a quiet yet outspoken artist.    

Peeping Tom

Michael Powell UK – 1960 – 101 min. As a boy, Mark Lewis was subjected to bizarre experiments by his scientist-father, who wanted to study and record the effects of fear on the nervous system. Now Mark murders women whilst filming their expressions of terror. He falls in love with Helen and they start dating, but is there any redemption for this murdering psychopath under police investigation?    

Persepolis

Marjane Satrapi France – 2007 – 96 min. As Marji grows up the idealistic Iranian revolution becomes a repressive fundamentalist tyranny. Because she refuses to keep quiet about the situation, her parents send her to Austria for her own safety and for a better life. The ‘free’ West, however, presents equally problematic cultural frictions. Nothing is as it seems, and the young woman must decide where she truly belongs.  

The Play House

Buster Keaton USA – 1921 – 23 min. After waking up from his wacky dream, a theater stage hand inadvertently causes havoc everywhere he goes.    

PlayTime

Jacques Tati France – 1967 – 115 min. In yet another outing by the bumbling Monsieur Hulot, we find him lost in the midst of technologically advanced Paris as he tries to locate an American official. During his search, he frequently crosses paths with a group of American tourists and chaos ensues wherever Hulot is to be found.    

Q

Quai des Orfèvres

Henri-Georges Clouzot France – 1947 – 106 min. Jenny Lamour is a promising singer who wants to make it big in postwar Paris. When she agrees to meet Brignon, a lecherous old businessman, at his house so as to ensure future performance engagements, her loving but jealous husband Maurice decides to follow her. He finds Brignon’s house open and the man dead on the floor. Inspector Antoine is assigned to investigate the case.    

R

 

The Rabbit Is Me

(Das Kaninchen bin ich) Kurt Maetzig GDR – 1965 – 110 min. Nineteen-year-old Maria dreams of studying, but her hopes are shattered when her brother, Dieter, is sent to prison for sedition against the state. She cannot enter college, and becomes a waitress. Maria meets and falls in love with Paul Deister, an older, married man who turns out to be the very judge who convicted her brother. Their affair ends when Deister’s hypocrisy is exposed.    

Ring of Fury

血指环 Tony Yeow & James Sebastian Singapore – 1973 – 78 min. When a humble noodle vendor refuses to pay protection money to a gang of thugs, tragedy befalls his family and loved ones. To exact revenge, he learns martial arts and sets off to deal with the gang led by a mysterious man in an iron mask.    

S

Silent Waters

(Khamosh Pani) Sabiha Sumar Pakistan – 2003 – 99 min. 1979. Ayesha, a widow haunted by the horrors of Partition, lives in a Punjabi village in Pakistan, with her 18-year-old son, Saleem. The boy is madly in love with Zubeida, an independent young woman, but when two strangers from Lahore arrive preaching extremist Islamic values, Saleem breaks up with Zubeida and begins to carry a gun, forcing Ayesha to relive her painful past.  

Siti

Eddie Cahyono Indonesia – 2014 – 95 min. A young mother, Siti has to take care of her son, invalid husband, and mother-in-law. By day, she sells snacks; by night, she is a karaoke bar hostess. Ashamed by his wife’s nighttime job, the husband no longer wishes to speak to her, while Siti herself is ridden by internal conflicts between her duties and desires.    

Statues also Die

(Les statues meurent aussi) Chris Marker France – 1953 – 30 min. An essay film about traditional African art and the effects colonialism has had on how it is perceived. The film won the 1954 Prix Jean Vigo but because of its social and political critique, the second half of the film was banned in France until the 1960s.    

Stray Dogs

Tsai Ming-liang Taiwan – 2013 – 138 min. An alcoholic man and his two young children barely survive in Taipei. They cross paths with a lonely grocery clerk who might help them make a better life.    

Sunrise

Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau USA – 1927 – 95 min. A vacationing woman from the city begins an affair with a local farmer, a happily married man with a young child. Completely taken with the sophisticated lady and the kind of excitement city life can promise, he is willing, at her suggestion, to drown his wife in order to free himself. With the murder planned, he sets the wheels in motion. But will he go through with it?    

T

 

To Singapore, with Love

Tan Pin Pin Singapore – 2013 – 70 min. Banned in its home country, this documentary traces the stories of several Singaporeans, who in the 1960s ‘70s were exiled from their country for communist activism. Fifty years later, they gather from around the globe to a hotel in Malaysia where they attend reunions, memorials, and catch a longing glimpse of their homeland from across the bay.    

Tristana

Luis Bunuel France/ Spain – 1970 – 99 min. When Tristana’s mother dies, she is entrusted to the guardianship of the older gentleman Don Lope. He is well-liked and honourable, despite being a socialist, but his one weakness is women, and he seduced the innocent girl, all the while explaining to her that she is as free as he. But when she acts on this freedom, Don Lope must deal with the consequences of his ideology.    

W

Walker Series

“With slowness,” says Tsai Ming-liang, “we return to the essence of cinema.” The figure of the Walker is based on 7th century Buddhist scholar and monk Xuanzang. The ‘slowness’ of Xuanzang is what is lacking in the modern world, and the director uses it to rebel against the ever-increasing pace of irrational commercial growth and mediated social interaction. The demand for speed, for him, places a constraint on the filmmaker. The element that binds this series is a Buddhist monk in a saffron robe (played by actor Lee Kang-Sheng) who walks slowly, almost imperceptibly—according to the Zen kinhin walking meditation practice—through public spaces, as life and the fleeting shadows of passers-by swarm around him.  

The War Game

Peter Watkins UK – 1965 – 121 min. In this fictional docudrama, a hypothetical Chinese invasion of South Vietnam triggers a new world war. In the town of Rochester, Kent, the anticipation of a nuclear attack leads to mass evacuations. When a stray missile actually explodes, the ensuing firestorm blinds all those who see it, and it does not take long before the fabric of society is ripped apart.  

Whispering Sands

(Pasir Berbisik) Nan Triveni Achnas Indonesia – 2001 – 106 min. Constantly daydreaming that her absent father will return, young Daya agonizes under the stern hand of her mother. Forced to move inland from their seaside home to a desert of constantly shifting sands, the pair settle down to their familiar antagonism. One day, Daya sees a vaguely familiar face shuffle in from across the wasteland.    

The Witness

(A tanú) Peter Bacso Hungary – 1969 – 105 min. During the height of the Rákosi Era, reminiscent of the ruthless Stalin regime, József Pelikán is arrested for illegally slaughtering his pig, Dezsõ. However, instead of punishment Pelikán is reassigned to a position generally reserved for the communist elite. Pelikán is utterly clueless as to his good luck, but will his social and professional advancement come at a terrible moral price?    

Y

 

You Can’t Take It with You

Franck Capra USA – 1938 – 126 min. Anthony Kirby is a wealthy banker who is buying up all the properties in a neighbourhood. Everyone has sold except Martin Vanderhof, who is happy living amongst a small commune of friends and relations. Kirby’s son, Tony, is in love with secretary Alice Sycamore, Mr. Vanderhof’s granddaughter. It’s more than a clash of families but a clash of outlooks, ideals and what’s important in life.    

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Costa Gavras France – 1969 – 127 min. In a Greek city in the 1960’s, a left-leaning politician is fatally injured in the street during a rally. The police claim that he was struck by a drunk driver but a prosecutor gathers evidence that this was a premeditated assassination, orchestrated by senior officials and right-wing extremists. Which truth will the State recognize?